‘….As You Wave Me Goodbye’

I don’t like being miserable. For a start, it peels at least 20 points off my IQ, and at my age, that’s too significant to ignore. Second, it makes creative thinking well nigh impossible. It closes up the essential gaps between those bubbling, spontaneous irregularities that sit in my unconscious, and the conveyor belt of conscious delivery. Third, it makes my face look like a smacked arse, and frankly, I prefer it less baggy and more crinkled, when the crinkles are herded into place by an irrepressible urge to giggle. But today I am royally stuffed. My father died last week. One of my cats died this morning. His brother is on the blink (same … Continue reading ‘….As You Wave Me Goodbye’

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You wait ages …

  … and three come along at once. Well, five, if you count ‘Lovely Girls‘ and ‘No Arrests‘. In the last few days, Full of Crow have taken ‘Arthur’s Stone’ and expect to publish it in October; Read Short Fiction took ‘Baby Bird’ to put up in the Spring; and Zouche Magazine & Miscellany have picked up my essay, ‘A Tale of Two Sixties’ and scheduled it for some time in the next 5-6 weeks. All a little bit wonderful. Continue reading You wait ages …

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I Don’t Like Mondays

I Don’t Like Mondays I was reminded of this by Sabrina Ogden’s piece ‘Excuse me, have you seen my shirt?‘ in Pure Slush this week. What our minds get up to when we’re not fully a-hold of the reins! I’d gone to work as usual but changed my route slightly with a view to using the outdoor parking area. So, tootling gently along and preparing to turn right at the appointed moment, I was mildly irritated to find that there was an obstruction accompanied by a degree of ill-disciplined vehicular negotiation (bad tempered spat) which conspired to prevent my egress onto the … Continue reading I Don’t Like Mondays

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‘No Arrests in 2039’: you might prefer to walk home …

Out on Every Day Fiction today. Suddenly, I want to know where my council tax goes! There is actually some science behind this piece of fiction. The Google research car has travelled thousands of miles without incident (see TED talk by Sebastian Thrun), and other vehicles have been driven remotely, including one by Gadget Show presenter Jason Bradbury in a race against an F1 driver. Both cars were live on the track. This set the scene, in my fevered mind at any rate, for a virtual cab company whose ‘drivers’ operate passenger pods from call centres. Then came the idea about what … Continue reading ‘No Arrests in 2039’: you might prefer to walk home …

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